Keeping your aircraft clean is an important part of being a responsible aircraft owner. Whether you need a quick rinse or a detailed deep clean or accessory cleaning, there are countless products on the market. Finding the right product for you shouldn’t be a pain, but since some cleaning chemicals can have an adverse effect on your aircraft, it’s good to know which products to avoid. Here are five products that should never be used on your aircraft:

Ammonia-based Window Cleaners:

Keeping your aircrafts windows clean will ensure you have good visibility while flying, but your typical household window cleaners can cause serious damage to your fastener windshield. Non-aviation specific cleaners can lead to crazing, or tiny cracks on the windshield's surface. More than an annoyance, these cracks can obscure sightlines, refract light unpredictably, and lead to larger cracks causing irreparable damage.

Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK):

MEK has been a commonly used cleaning product in the aviation industry for some time. If used properly, it will not damage your aircraft, but discoveries in the last decade have found that it has an extremely negative effect on the user’s health. The Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America have stated that prolonged exposure to MEK can lead to chronic headache, asthma, flu-like symptoms, dizziness, malaise, and fatigue.

Chlorine Bleach:

While this is a good product for keeping domestic bathrooms clean, chlorine bleach should never be used in your aircraft lavatory. The chief concern is bleach’s ability to damage seals and the lavatory vacuum system by stripping away the protective layers of these components. Furthermore, if bleach is mixed with lavatory deodorant fluid (blue juice), it can fill the aircraft with toxic fumes.

Dish Soaps:

Cleaning the underside of your aircraft is crucial due to the buildup of grease, dirt, and oil over time caused by repeated takeoffs and landings. It’s important to use aircraft-specific cleaners for this because common dish soap are not suited for grease of this strength and will usually leave a soapy film/residue.

Wood Cleaning Products:

This is another chemical that can have a negative effect on your aircraft. These products are designed to leave a shiny film, but the film can actually leave a layer of wax that traps dirt and grease underneath.

Just as important as keeping your aircraft clean is using the proper cleaning materials. While these five are the most commonly used, there are many other cleaning products to avoid. The best way to ensure your aircraft’s safety is to use only aviation-specific products. At Cogent Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@cogentpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.


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A first flight is a momentous occasion. It’s when years of planning, development, and manufacturing culminates in an aircraft’s first time in the sky, when all that hard work pays off and for most aircraft, they do so while painted in a drab shade of olive green. Why are prototype aircraft painted in such an unappealing shade?

The reason is because aircraft need to be primed before they are painted, and for aircraft primer of choice is a zinc chromate or zinc phosphate that adheres well to the aluminum that aircraft are typically made from. The greatest advantage of zinc chromate and phosphate primer, however, is that it has anti-corrosive properties — a serious concern for aircraft. Prototype aircraft on their first flight will get a layer of green primer to protect against corrosion, but will not get their actual paint-job until later. Additionally, if there are any surfaces of an aircraft that are colored blue, it is because those surfaces are made of lightweight composite materials, not aluminum, and therefore are treated differently to protect against corrosion.

Corrosion-resistant primer was first used by the Ford Motor Company in the 1920s, and adopted for use in commercial and military aviation in the 1930s. United States Army Air Corps documents mention using zinc chromate primer in 1933, and was made standard for use in 1936. Zinc chromate was also extensively used throughout World War 2 by the United States, while Germany and other Axis powers used lacquer-based protective coatings. The British would adopt zinc chromate primer in 1945 for the Martin-Baker MB5.

Despite their unappealing shade, first-flight aircraft are completely functional. They are, however, often almost completely empty as well. Commercial aircraft are first flown without seating or interior decor, for instance, while military aircraft’s first flights are performed without weapons systems mounted. First flights are effectively a proof of concept, showing that an airframe can function properly in the air outside of computer simulations and wind-tunnel testing. Only after subsequent test flights do engineers start installing interior components and slap a coat of paint on.

At Cogent Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft paints and primers for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@cogentpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.


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Lubrication is a critical part of maintaining a piston engine’s health, be it in an automobile or an aircraft. Lubricants, as their name implies, reduce the friction and wear between moving parts. They do much more than just that, however; lubricants in aircraft engines also clean, cool, and seal the parts they work with, as well as help prevent corrosion and rust in the engine.

Rust and corrosion prevention are especially important in aircraft that see infrequent use, as their frequent downtime leaves them more vulnerable to degradation. Good lubricants can, therefore, go a long way in preventing rust or corrosion from occurring.

Another key task that lubricants perform is cleaning. While cleaning normally means removing sludge, varnishes, and grunge accumulations, it also means cleaning the ring belt area, which maintains control of the combustion process. When rings are able to move freely, the engine operates better, produces less blow-by, and consumes less oil. A dirty ring belt, however, restrains the movement of the rings within the grooves, and prevents them from sealing. This can create pressure between the ring face and the cylinder wall, leading to wear, scarring, or scuffing.

Oil lubricants also help with the cooling process. By serving as a heat-transfer medium that flows through the crankcase and the oil coolers, it dissipates the heat from moving parts, thus cooling the ending bearings and piston rings.

Lubricant oils also provide a seal between the rings and cylinder walls, as well as the gasketed areas and the rubber or synthetic seals of the crankshaft. When oil washes around those areas, it helps retain a seal between them.

At Cogent Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft engine lubricants for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@cogentpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.


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Spacecraft and airplanes are intricate machines that are designed and built to precise specifications, including which alloying element works best for individual components. Aluminum, copper, and nickel are most commonly used because of their ability to resist wear and tear, they can withstand high temperatures, and their magnetic properties. New applications have been found to utilize these metals and vastly improve existing designs.

Aluminum has found a home in aircraft construction and has been used for decades. It provides excellent strength as well as an economically friendly weight to cost ratio. It is estimated that almost 80% of the materials in modern aircraft is aluminum. The fuselage, wings, and supporting structures of commercial aircraft are all constructed of this metal alloy; aluminum can withstand a high level of UV rays as well. New technologies are on the forefront of aluminum as new casting technologies offer lower manufacturing costs, the ability to form complex shapes, and the flexibility to incorporate innovative design concepts. Copper is also a popular alloy in aircraft construction.

Copper-based alloys are commonly used where construction requires materials that have high strength, resistance to corrosion, and excellent ductility. These parts are often safety critical and require long term operation such as electrical components, copper wire, generators, and data transfer systems. Copper is also a non-magnetic metal which means it won’t interfere with any electrical applications, making it practical to use in these applications. It is easily malleable and highly conductive. Its reliability and wide array of uses makes it an important alloy in the construction of a n aircraft. The same applies to nickel.

Nickel alloys are used in gas turbine engines, combustion chambers, engine exhaust valves, spacecraft, and many more applications. It has magnetic properties, excellent resistance to wear and tear, and can sustain extreme temperatures. In gas turbine engines, nickel can be found in the combustion chamber of an engine. The continuous stream of pressurized gas, as well as the constant flame, makes nickel the best metal alloy for this function. It is also found in the exhaust valves of aircraft. When you mix nickel with tungsten or molybdenum, it allows it to withstand even higher temperatures. On spacecraft, nickel can be found on the outer parts of the vessel; it protects against UV rays as well as tiny meteoroids. Without this heat resistant alloy, we may not have been able to walk on the moon.

At Cogent Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@cogentpurchasing.com or call us at +1-914-359-2001.


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Corrosion is an all-too-common result of electrochemical reactions between materials and substances in their environment. It is the gradual destruction of the metal by way of a chemical reaction with the environment. Metal corrosion is incredibly damaging to your aircraft, in particular, the engine. A keen eye during a thorough inspection can help spot areas of rust and corrosion that commonly go unnoticed. In certain cases, a complete overhaul is the only way these areas get noticed.

Factors affecting corrosion include acids, salts, and alkalis. It will typically appear as a discoloration (white, green, grey, or red), or a rusting of the metal. Corrosion leads to pitting, which can significantly decrease the strength of the aircraft, induce cracks, and inevitably put the aircraft out of commission. It’s important to recognize that even if your aircraft engine is properly oiled, it is still prone to corrosion; moisture can still be present in oil.

When an aircraft is in use it emits a significant amount of heat. As the aircraft engine oil temperature rises, moisture is driven out and often rises to cooler parts of the engine. This vaporized moisture will settle on the metal and accelerate the corrosion process on whichever surface it landed on. This can occur anywhere heat and condensation accrue on the aircraft.

The frame of your aircraft is also susceptible to corrosion and can suffer from discoloration, or worse, weakening of the material. The weather is a leading contributor to external metal corrosion, making it essentially unavoidable for an aircraft. The water vapor in the air, combined with wet climates, creates a powerful corrosive agitator. If you add in the industrial particles and fumes that your aircraft emits, we have a recipe for corrosion. Inactive aircraft are also susceptible. Proper polishing, treatment, and maintenance are preventative measures that can be implemented to deter corrosion.

It’s imperative to perform regular inspections and maintenance checks to ensure any damage on the aircraft is noticed immediately. Prompt treatment is required to prevent any further corrosion. There are areas that can easily be forgotten when inspecting for signs of corrosion: wheel wells, landing gear, wing flaps, battery compartments, cooling air vents, bilge areas, and any other water entrapment spaces. The risk and cost of corrosion damage are significantly high in aging aircrafts. Aircraft corrosion has become a multibillion-dollar issue, a number which can be reduced by proper and routine inspections.

Corrosion and oxidation are a thorn in an aircraft owners’ side. External aircraft corrosion has the potential to become be costly and dangerous. Environmental factors have the ability to accelerate the corrosion process of aircraft materials, implementing the proper precautions is imperative.

At Cogent Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@cogentpurchasing.com or call us at +1-914-359-2001.


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